Emily Hodge

Emily Hodge

Emily Hodge is a doctoral candidate in the Educational Theory and Policy program at The Pennsylvania State University. Her dissertation research explores how educational systems, schools, and teachers negotiate the tension between standardization and differentiation in the context of Common Core implementation. Using qualitative methods, she examines (1) how messages about the Common Core State Standards and equity shifted from the national level to the district and teacher levels across a diverse, metropolitan district in the South; (2) the role of intermediary organizations in defining the meaning of the Common Core; (3) the relationship between policy messages, school organization, and teachers’ views of student ability; and (4) how teachers construed the needs of their students and differentiated aspects of their curriculum and instruction to meet those needs. Her next project builds on her dissertation work by analyzing state-level Common Core professional development resources, in order to examine the role of intermediary organizations in defining “Common Core instruction.”

Hodge’s previous work on the varied interpretations of the Common Core English/Language Arts standards for classroom instruction appears in English Teaching: Practice and Critique. In addition, Hodge is co-editing a book with David Gamson on school district history, featuring a group of historical and contemporary manuscripts that offer new perspectives on how school districts can be both innovative and bureaucratic—often simultaneously—through examples of districts responding to changing demographics, instructional reforms, and structural changes.

Hodge is the managing editor of the American Journal of Education and is on the steering committee for the national Detracked Schools Network. She has a master’s in English literature and a master’s in teaching from the University of Virginia. From 2007 to 2010, she was a middle school Language Arts teacher at the Quaker Valley School District in western Pennsylvania.

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